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Business News

Negotiations leading to $558M Finish Line sale full of surprises | Indianapolis Business Journal
Indianapolis Business Journal | June 21, 2018
A new regulatory said Sports Direct International Inc., the United Kingdom-based sports-apparel retailer that was rumored for months to be on the verge of buying Indianapolis-based Finish Line, never actually wanted to buy the company.
New studies show women less confident, less knowledgeable about money matters | Indianapolis Business Journal
Indianapolis Business Journal | June 19, 2018
Just more than half of married women leave long-term financial decisions, including those about investing, to their spouses, even though the wives often are handling the daily household budget.
Do Britain’s railways need a Fat Controller? | The Economist
The Economist | June 19, 2018
ON MAY 20th, the biggest changes to train timetables in modern British history took place, affecting commuters and business travellers across the country. In the weeks beforehand, the train-operating companies had been spinning the changes as good news for passengers due to an increase in the number...
Wind-energy developer dismisses auditor after being informed of accounting weaknesses | Indianapolis Business Journal
Indianapolis Business Journal | June 17, 2018
Infrastructure & Energy Alternatives Inc. dismissed auditor Crowe Horwath and said it is taking steps to address the financial issues raised.
2018 Innovation Issue: There’s promise in cryptocurrencies but plenty of skepticism, too | Indianapolis Business Journal
Indianapolis Business Journal | June 17, 2018
Cryptocurrency might not be coming to a bank near you—yet. But bitcoin ATMs are springing up across central Indiana and the nation, and some tech leaders say that, within a decade, cryptocurrency could be more life-altering than the internet.
Path to $1.6 billion acquisition by Lilly full of twists and turns | Indianapolis Business Journal
Indianapolis Business Journal | June 16, 2018
At one point this spring, Lilly and three other companies were simultaneously angling to buy AMRO BioSciences.
A new breed of German startups | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
At a rooftop bar in Berlin on May 29th, the glitterati of Germany’s startup scene toasted a new arrival. Silicon Valley Bank, a commercial lender which counts as customers half of American startups that went public in 2017, has just opened an office in the country. “They are doing unique, cool t...
Trends in extortion payments by companies to Italy’s Mafia | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
THE toll of “pizzo” protection payments made by firms to Sicily’s Mafia is closely monitored. Nearly half pay up these days, according to estimates from the Confartigianato, a national business association—a big improvement from the early 1990s, when at least four-fifths of Sicilian firms pa...
Google runs into more flak on artificial intelligence | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
DISCOVERING and harnessing fire unlocked more nutrition from food, feeding the bigger brains and bodies that are the hallmarks of modern humans. Google’s chief executive, Sundar Pichai, thinks his company’s development of artificial intelligence trumps that. “AI is one of the most important th...
Can refugees help to plug Europe’s skilled-labour gaps? | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
THE canteen of Stockholm University could scarcely be more Swedish. Young blond students sip coffee and tap away on Macs. In room 3.89, an outpost of the campus, is another, newer Sweden. Refugees, all of them teachers, from lands far to the south and east are preparing for the classrooms of their n...
The murky future of two Latin American oil giants | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
Truckers’ pricing powerIT SEEMED like such a comeback. When Pedro Parente took over as boss of Petrobras in 2016, Brazil’s state oil firm was drowning in $130bn of debt. It had lost $200bn in shareholder value, and its executive board had been gutted by the massive Lava Jato corruption scandal. ...
How open is America? | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
“JUSTIN has agreed to cut all tariffs and all trade barriers between Canada and the United States,” claimed President Donald Trump to laughter on June 8th, at the G7 summit in Quebec. The next day, in apparent seriousness, Mr Trump—who has slapped tariffs and quotas on imports of aluminium and...
Can the solar industry survive without subsidies? | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
A LITTLE over a decade ago, when JinkoSolar, a Shanghai-based company, entered the solar business, it was such a novice that when it visited international trade fairs, all it had was a bare table and a board with its name scribbled on it. But it also had luck, a technological edge and lots of public...
How to play Argentina | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
THERE is a type of footballer who inspires the affection of fans and the ire of coaches. He is talented, usually extravagantly so. But he is also wayward to the same lavish degree. Discipline seems beyond him, on or off the pitch. It was said of one of this kind, Stan Bowles of Queens Park Rangers a...
Why Japan’s sharing economy is tiny | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
AIRBNB, an American platform for booking stays in other people’s houses, can barely conceal its frustration. A law passed last year for the first time legalised minpaku, or home-sharing, in Japan, but also sharply restricted it. From June 15th hosts can rent out their property for a maximum of 180...
China’s tighter regulation of shadow banks begins to bite | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
THE teller at ICBC, China’s (and the world’s) biggest bank, ushers a new, well-heeled customer into a private room. It is not for VIP treatment but a stern warning. The customer wants to invest in products offering higher returns than a basic savings account. The teller fixes a camera on her and...
The insecurity of freelance work | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
THE decline of the conventional job has been much heralded in recent years. It is now nearly axiomatic that people will work for a range of employers in a variety of roles over their lifetimes, with a much more flexible schedule than in the past. Opinion is still divided over whether this change is ...
Other American banks may have misbehaved as Wells Fargo did. Which ones? | The Economist
The Economist | June 14, 2018
Role modelIF THERE is a single example of how dramatically the regulatory environment has changed for American banks in the past 18 months, it may be the trickle of information that has recently emerged about an inquiry into their sales practices. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC),...